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Suspended Feather Installations by Isa Barbier

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Suspended Feather Installations by Isa Barbier multiples installation feathers

Suspended Feather Installations by Isa Barbier multiples installation feathers

Suspended Feather Installations by Isa Barbier multiples installation feathers

Suspended Feather Installations by Isa Barbier multiples installation feathers

I’m really enjoying these suspended installations by French artist Isa Barbier who uses feathers hung on filament to create abstract geometric volumes. These two works above are definitely my favorite but you can head over to Documents d’artistes to see much more. (via ferme-asile, jean-louis pitteloud)

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argentbeauquest
2816 days ago
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Feather Installations... #art
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Supersonic Stereo

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Supersonic Stereo

What if you somehow managed to make a stereo travel at twice the speed of sound, would it sound backwards to someone who was just casually sitting somewhere as it flies by?

—Tim Currie

Yes.

Technically, anyway. It would be pretty hard to hear.

The basic idea is pretty straightforward. The stereo is going faster than its own sound, so it will reach you first, followed by the sound it emitted one second ago, followed by the sound it emitted two seconds ago, and so forth.

The problem is that the stereo is moving at Mach 2, which means that two seconds ago, it was over a kilometer away. It’s hard to hear music from that distance, particularly when your ears were just hit by (a) a sonic boom, and (b) pieces of a rapidly disintegrating stereo.

Wind speeds of Mach 2 would messily disassemble most consumer electronics. The force of the wind on the body of the stereo is roughly comparable to that of a dozen people standing on it:

An ordinary stereo wouldn’t make it, but one with some kind of ruggedized high-strength casing might be able to survive.

If we put together a durable, heavy-duty stereo and launch it on a ballistic trajectory, it will only be traveling at supersonic speeds for the first 150 meters or so. This means that the target will hear a maximum of about a third of a second of reversed music.

This reversed-sound phenomenon is actually confirmed in the 2008 paper Reproduction of Virtual Sound Sources Moving at Supersonic Speeds in Wave Field Synthesis, which says that the sound wave field “contains a component carrying a time-reversed version of the source’s input signal”.

The sonic boom would be the first thing the target would hear. It would be followed by several sounds played over one another, including both reversed music (rising slightly in pitch as it fades out) and forward-playing music (which would play at half speed and an octave too low), followed by the crash of a stereo demolishing your neighbor’s shed.

Which means that if you’re playing one of those albums containing secret demonic messages, the result will be the strangest listening experience of your life:

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argentbeauquest
2816 days ago
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Interesting... #sound
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11 public comments
mrmkenyon
2816 days ago
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She deafened me with Science!
tedder
2816 days ago
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going to be hard to explain this to the insurance company when you blow up the neighborhood.
Uranus
Dugstar2020
2816 days ago
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Science yo!
itsmoirob
2816 days ago
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A better What If from XKCD
Robin Hood shire.
rclatterbuck
2816 days ago
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.
Brstrk
2816 days ago
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Delicious science!
NielsRak
2817 days ago
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It’s hard to hear music from that distance, particularly when your ears were just hit by (a) a sonic boom, and (b) pieces of a rapidly disintegrating stereo.
taylorlapeyre
2816 days ago
Funniest and most interesting blog on the internet.
sheppy
2817 days ago
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This sounds like a worthwhile experiment. No pun intended.
Maryville, Tennessee, USA
stsquad
2817 days ago
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True fact ;-)
Cambridge, UK
mrmkenyon
2816 days ago
The best kind of fact!
weelillad
2817 days ago
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Cool. I won't mind observing this once in my life.
Singapore

A Hovering Magnetic Cloud and Other Kinetic Sculptures by Laurent Debraux

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A Hovering Magnetic Cloud and Other Kinetic Sculptures by Laurent Debraux sculpture magnets kinetic sculpture

A Hovering Magnetic Cloud and Other Kinetic Sculptures by Laurent Debraux sculpture magnets kinetic sculpture

A Magnetic Hovering Cloud and Other Kinetic Sculptures by Laurent Debraux sculpture magnets kinetic sculpture

A Magnetic Hovering Cloud and Other Kinetic Sculptures by Laurent Debraux sculpture magnets kinetic sculpture

A Magnetic Hovering Cloud and Other Kinetic Sculptures by Laurent Debraux sculpture magnets kinetic sculpture

A Hovering Magnetic Cloud and Other Kinetic Sculptures by Laurent Debraux sculpture magnets kinetic sculpture

I’m really enjoying these kinetic sculptures by artist Laurent Debraux who works primarily with magnets, metallic objects and ferrofluid. The artist was just exhibiting at the Kinetica Art Fair in London and if you missed it head over to YouTube channel where you can catch over 30 videos of his work.

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argentbeauquest
2827 days ago
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#kinetic
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Grand Portal Point

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Photo 403
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argentbeauquest
2834 days ago
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#photo
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Picturesque Chinese Landscapes are Actually Disguised Photos of Landfills

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Picturesque Chinese Landscapes are Actually Disguised Photos of Landfills  landscapes collage China

Picturesque Chinese Landscapes are Actually Disguised Photos of Landfills  landscapes collage China

Picturesque Chinese Landscapes are Actually Disguised Photos of Landfills  landscapes collage China

Picturesque Chinese Landscapes are Actually Disguised Photos of Landfills  landscapes collage China

Picturesque Chinese Landscapes are Actually Disguised Photos of Landfills  landscapes collage China

Take a few steps back or perhaps just squint your eyes and these images by artist Yao Lu might resemble traditional Chinese landscape paintings of cliffs, waterfalls, and mountains. Look a bit closer and your perspective may change. Lu digitally assembles each of her images using photographs of landfills and other aspects of urbanization draped in green mesh to mimic idyllic scenery. Similar to the recent work of Yang Yongliang featured on this blog just last week, Lu seems to be making a thinly-veiled commentary on the encroaching ecological threat of urbanization. See much more over at Bruce Silverstein Gallery. (via beautiful decay)

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argentbeauquest
2834 days ago
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#clever #art
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Mosquito Beach

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Photo 404
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argentbeauquest
2834 days ago
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